Serial Number Matrix

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Serial Number Matrix

Post  Frank N. Peavey on Sun Oct 24, 2010 1:24 pm

Peavey did not design any hidden codes in their serial number system like some manufacturers. The first four gives you and approximate year of manufacture and the last four are the sequential build number. Bear in mind that an instrument could be made in year X but have the previous or prior year "code". You can decipher the codes on the pots to get an idea of build date too, as long as you've got the original pots.

Here is the accepted serial number matrix that has been used through recent years. I have one guitar that Peavey told me one year but the matrix told me another. Other than that it's pretty dang accurate.

xxxxxx 1978 (six numbers)
8Mxxxxxx 1978 (8M and six numbers)
0000xxxx - 0030xxxx 1978
0031xxxx - 0047xxxx 1979
0048xxxx - 0065xxxx 1980
0066xxxx - 0099xxxx 1981
0100xxxx - 0129xxxx 1982
0130xxxx - 0169xxxx 1983
0170xxxx - 0199xxxx 1984
0200xxxx - 0239xxxx 1985
0240xxxx - 0259xxxx 1986
0260xxxx - 0339xxxx 1987
0340xxxx - 0359xxxx 1988
0360xxxx - 0419xxxx 1989
0420xxxx - 0439xxxx 1990
0440xxxx - 0519xxxx 1991
0520xxxx - 0599xxxx 1992
0600xxxx - 0639xxxx 1993
0640xxxx - 0769xxxx 1994
0770xxxx - 1995

I have seen one 8N serial number T-60. It was clearly an "N" and not an "M". I'm still trying to track down more info on that.


Last edited by Frank N. Peavey on Sun Oct 24, 2010 1:29 pm; edited 2 times in total
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Re: Serial Number Matrix

Post  Frank N. Peavey on Sun Oct 24, 2010 1:27 pm

Here is some additional serial number info that Chip Todd shared with us on the original unofficial T-60 Forum.

"During the last few years, I have received more than a few T-60s that were the very first ones made on the gunstock carving machine and the Ekstrom-Carlson router, before production was even in sight. The sequence of markings on the first ones was;

CT-1, CT-2, CT-B, the first three built in my carport for the 1976 NAMM show. They were in order, 6 keys per side, 3 keys per side, and the bass. These were hand-stamped.

The next ones were:
Guitar Dept. 1, through Guitar Dept. 5 or 6.(1976) Hand-stamped

Then 0000000.0 through .00000000, 000000.0.0, and 00000.0.0.0 and these were the sales rep samples. Note that the decimal points progressed through the eight numerals and the last of the ten had two decimals. These would let us know and identify if any of the sales reps "lost" their sample. (late 1976 or early 1977)

There were some undisciplined zero-numbered ones with various single digit numbers included in the zeros, which went to artists like, Chet Atkins, Jerry Reed, Neal Diamond, Billy Gibbons, etc.( 1977)

I remember the "8Mxxxxxx"s, but am not sure where they were in the order, only that they weren't before the above and the #00245XXX which was the true first production guitar and was presented to Mississippi Music in Meridian, MS, (the store that Hartley's dad owned before retiring). The Schmidt Serial Numbering head didn't have the capability of letters, only numbers, so there would have been only a very few with the 8Mxxxxxx.

There were a few specials, like the Magnolia wood T-40 bass for Ken Achard, author of "The History and Development of the American Guitar" (with rear mounted pickups and controls), that were made, with Hartley's blessing, off the records and with their initials for serial numbers. hand-stamped
Charley Gressett, his wife, my wife, and I went to see Neal Diamond years later, in California, when we worked for Fender, and were appalled that he had red, white, and blue, NEON TUBES outlining the T-60 that he played when singing "Coming To America", (or something like that). That was probably his 000000XX.

"That's all I know about that".....F. Gump

Chip"

"It's humorous to read the word,"Vintage" after almost any guitar that's a decade or more old. The word has no meaning anymore. There are two T-60s on ebay now that have an 8Mxxxxxx E serial number. What's funny to me as they don't know that the "E" was stamped on guitars with blemishes and small mistakes and were only sold to employees at a good discount. Those are seconds or blems, not "Vintage" and special units. I do like the part about "rare", meaning we must have not made too many mistakes or they wouldn't be "rare"

Chip"
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